A bowl of cacti

She gave me a beautifully arranged little bowl with a variety of colourful, healthy-looking cacti in it.

CactiLast time I saw my sister, Ruth, she surprised me with an early birthday present. She gave me a beautifully arranged little bowl with a variety of colourful, healthy-looking cacti in it. Lovely!

So – did she grow them painstakingly from seed? Or did she buy them fully grown and re-pot them in this beautiful arrangement? Or perhaps she bought the little earthenware pot already planted up.

To see what she did, scroll down for a larger picture…

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Here is the answer…
Cacti
She crocheted them, pot and all! How clever! How unexpected! And what fun. Thank you, Ruth!

The work of the Spirit

the Holy Spirit … runs deep in [the] forgotten ways. He is … the Spirit of Christ and he was sent specifically to enable us to continue the work of Jesus.

What follows is an extract from JDMC, the first section on the Holy Spirit (page 37).

Cover-tinyThe work of the Holy Spirit is mentioned briefly in the previous part of JDMC, ‘Six – More than community’ (p 33). It is not explicitly presented in The Forgotten Ways, but it is certainly implied on every page. In the first edition of JDMC I closely followed the structure of Alan Hirsch’s work, but in this revision I have decided to add extra sections including this one about the Spirit.

I want to guard against any suggestion that JDMC is merely presenting an organisational mechanism for rapid missional spread. It’s much more than a worldly method or a management technique. Instead it is the pattern set by Christ himself, and therefore the Spirit of Christ is present throughout and waiting for us to hear his guidance and encouragement as we do the work the Master has entrusted to us. To depend on human technique alone won’t cut the mustard – far from it! One of the forgotten ways is keeping Jesus central, following only him, adding nothing in addition. This utter dependence on Christ surely implies and demands a dependence on his Spirit – how could it possibly be otherwise?

We need to recognise that this new life we live is not just about what we do, nor is it entirely about receiving from the Spirit. Jesus wants our co-operation. If there was no need for the work of the Spirit, why would Paul warn us not to quench him? (1 Thessalonians 5:19) And if there was no need for human effort and will, why would he tell us to strive? (1 Thessalonians 5:15, 1 Timothy 4:10)

So in this additional part of JDMC I want to highlight some of the ways we can recognise and value the Holy Spirit’s activity as we attempt to remember and activate the six forgotten ways. I also offer some advice on spiritual listening at the end.

To be clear, this section should not be seen as an additional ‘forgotten way’. It isn’t that at all. But the work of the Holy Spirit surely runs deep in each of those six forgotten ways. He is, as already mentioned, the Spirit of Christ and he was sent specifically to enable us to continue the work of Jesus. If we are the body and Jesus is our head, then the Spirit is like a nervous system – fundamentally centred in the head but with sensory and motor connections to every part of the body. When we resist him and are disobedient, part of the body is effectively paralysed. And if the body acts without the Holy Spirit it is sleepwalking and ineffective.

If all of this sounds hard – it is. We have to learn to die so that we can begin to live in Christ. It’s not that we have to work hard to be more like Jesus; rather we have to let go of all our own goals and desires and effort and planning and let Jesus live his life in us. He will tell us and show us what to do, when to do it, and how. The Holy Spirit is no less than the Spirit of Christ, he is our guide and walks with us in every situation. He is the heart and mind of the Messiah expressing himself through his people.

Talk together about the ways the Holy Spirit has interacted with you in your lives as you follow Jesus. Are there some encouraging stories you can share?

– o0o –

In 2015 I released the second version of JDMC, a discussion guide for Alan Hirsch’s ‘The Forgotten Ways’ in which he analyses the basis of movements throughout church history and identifies the essential ingredients for such movements to start and to be sustained.

(You can download JDMC in full, there’s no charge.)

Water and the Spirit

Do we live every day, still dripping with Holy Spiritness, touching a broken world with Christ’s love and grace?

In Acts 1:5 we read Jesus’ words to his followers, ‘John baptised with water, but in a few days you will be baptised with the Holy Spirit’.

The photo shows a man who has just been baptised by full immersion in water; maybe you have experienced this too, or maybe not. As you will know (or can imagine) this experience affects people in a variety of ways.

Baptism

Before baptism you are dry, afterwards you are drenched from head to toe. Being plunged into water takes your breath away, it makes you screw up your eyes. It’s exciting, a significant change in your life, you’ll remember it for as long as you live, and it’s a sign of the fact that your life has changed. Baptism is an outward expression that you’ve decided to follow Jesus in every way you can, and that, like him, you have been buried and returned to a new and fuller life.

The entire process speaks of this other kind of baptism, baptism in the Holy Spirit. and this, too, has a major effect. But unlike water baptism with its temporary impact, baptism in the Spirit is permament.

So what are the effects, the impact, of baptism in the Holy Spirit? As with water, you are plunged into a strikingly different element – not water this time, but the Spirit of Christ. You will be fundamentally drenched in his character and his power, you will be a citizen of his kingdom as it impacts this broken world. Baptism in the Spirit should take your breath away – utterly. It will cause you to screw up your spiritual senses through complete overload! There is an exciting and significant change in your spiritual life, you will always remember it and you will never be the same again. It’s a sign of the fact that your life has changed, you are redeemed, made new, and empowered because it is now Christ who lives in you and you are expressing his heart and his purposes. It’s evidence of a new life.

And how do we measure up? Do we remain permanently affected by the presence within us of Christ’s Spirit? Or do we treat spiritual baptism like water baptism? Is it something that happened in the past but no longer has any direct effect in the here and now? Is it something we remember, but have stopped experiencing?

Do we live every day, still dripping with Holy Spiritness, touching a broken world with Christ’s love and grace, sharing the good news of the peace and joy now available to all? I only needed to be baptised once, but the effects of this spiritual baptism are meant to last forever.